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NaHHA September Training Calendar Announced

September 17, 2021 Hawaii News No Comments
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How well do we really know our home? Embedded in the names of the places around us are layers of meaning, stories, and memories of people and events.

Knowing the cultural landscape of an area helps us understand and appreciate the sense of place (as Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association co-founder Dr. George Kanahele would say) of the places we love – and this sense of place is why so many people around the world long to visit us when it is safe to do so.
NaHHA is offering several free online learning opportunities each month to help us get to know our home better.
Vision of our Founders
Regardless of where we come from or what our DNA says we are, mālama, to take care of something, is an inherent part of Hawaiʻi’s collective consciousness. Pulling from the work of one of NaHHAʻs founding board members and inspired by Senator Kenny Brownʻs Mālama speech given in 1973, the value of mālama acknowledges the need to feel rooted, connected and responsible for our places of origin or the places we call home and sets a course of action where the guiding principles of mālama can be put into daily practice.
Mālama
Thursday, September 16, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. via Zoom
Wahi Pana O Maui
Lāhaina. Kaʻānapali. Ukumehame. Maʻalaea.
Learn the multi-faceted history of this area on the northwest side of Maui, best known today for its resorts and visitor attractions, but historically a seat of royal power.
Lāhaina. Ukumehame. Maʻalaea. What do these names have to do with Maui? In this one hour session, Kainoa Horcajo will take you on a huakaʻi (journey) around the moku (district) of Lāhaina where we will learn the cultural stories and history of some of the most beloved, visited, and sometimes misrepresented wahi pana (storied places) of the island of Maui.
Wahi Pana O Lāhaina
Friday, September 17, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. via Zoom
Waikapū. Wailuku. Waiehu. Waiheʻe.
Between Maui’s majestic mountains is Wailuku, the district that is home to Nā Wai ʻEhā – the four great waters that bring life to the island.
Waikapū. Wailuku. Waiehu. Waiheʻe. What do these names have to do with Maui? In this one hour session, Kainoa Horcajo will take you on a huakaʻi (journey) around the moku (district) of Wailuku where we will learn the cultural stories and history of some of the most beloved, visited, and sometimes misrepresented wahi pana (storied places) of the island of Maui.
Wahi Pana O Wailuku
Thursday, September 23, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. via Zoom
Wahi Pana O Hawaiʻi
Kohala. Puʻukohola. Moʻokini. Kokoiki.
At the north end of Hawaiʻi Island, the district of Kohala is the birthplace of Kamehameha, where he learned diplomacy and warfare, and launched his unification of the Hawaiian Islands. It is also home to one of the oldest heiau (temples) in Hawaiʻi.
Kohala. Puʻukohola. Moʻokini. Kokoiki. What do these names have to do with Hawaiʻi Island? In this one hour session, Hiʻilani Shibata will take you on a huakaʻi (journey) around the cultural sites of Kohala, Hawaiʻi Island where we will learn the cultural stories and history of some of the most beloved, visited, and sometimes misrepresented wahi pana (storied places).
Wahi Pana O Kohala
Wednesday, September 22, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. via Zoom
Keauhou. Hōlua. Kauikeaouli. Hāpaialiʻi.
The area of Keauhou in Kona is the birthplace and training ground of royalty, the site of battles that changed the course of history, and a place where pivotal decisions were made to preserve our natural and cultural heritage for the future.
Keauhou. Hōlua. Kauikeaouli. Hāpaialiʻi. What do these names have to do with Hawaiʻi Island? In this one hour session, Hiʻilani Shibata will take you on a huakaʻi (journey) around the cultural sites of Keauhou, Hawaiʻi Island where we will learn the cultural stories and history of some of the most beloved, visited, and sometimes misrepresented wahi pana (storied places).
Wahi Pana O Keauhou
Thursday, September 30, 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. via Zoom
Hawaiian Values Training
As our visitor industry welcomes kamaʻāina and visitors back, NaHHA is offering our visitor industry workforce training sessions virtually. Led by Hiʻilani Shibata, Hoʻokipa: Hawaiʻi Style will cover the values of aloha, hoʻokipa and kuleana to foster a sense of belonging, encourage personal initiative, and build a collective knowledge of the history of place.
Hoʻokipa: Hawaiʻi Style
Friday, September 24, 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. via Zoom
Introduction to Hawaiian Language
Language is a tool and a lens through which we can learn, interpret, and activate culture. Led by Hiʻilani Shibata, examine the rich history of the Hawaiian language and put the basics into practice using the pīʻapā (the Hawaiian alphabet) and tools such as the hakalama pronunciation drills. Normalizing the use of the Hawaiian language is a key component to creating authentic engagement experiences with our visitors and guests.
ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi – An Introduction to Hawaiian Language
Tuesday, September 28, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. via Zoom
Wahi Pana O Oʻahu
Kalākaua. Kuekaunahi. Kapahulu. Kapiʻolani.
Waikīkī today is the piko (spiritual center) of Hawaiʻi’s visitor industry. But long before visitors began arriving, Waikīkī was a center for royalty, a hub of food production, and a seaside kamaʻāina neighborhood. Explore all these eras in this course.
Kalākaua. Kuekaunahi. Kapahulu. Kapiʻolani. In this one hour session, Uncle Joe Recca will take you on a huakaʻi (journey) around Waikīkī, Oʻahu where we will learn the cultural stories and history of some of the most beloved, visited, and sometimes misrepresented wahi pana(storied places) in Waikīkī.
Wahi Pana O Waikīkī – Part 1
Returning in October 2021
Paoakalani. Pualeilani. Kūhiō. Kahanamoku.
Waikīkī today is the piko (spiritual center) of Hawaiʻi’s visitor industry. But long before visitors began arriving, Waikīkī was a center for royalty, a hub of food production, and a seaside kamaʻāina neighborhood. Explore all these eras in this course.
Paoakalani. Pualeilani. Kūhiō. Kahanamoku. What do these names have to do with Waikīkī? In this one hour session, Uncle Joe Recca will take you on a huakaʻi (journey) on the old Waikīkī Historic Trail, where we will learn the cultural stories and history of some of the most beloved, visited, and sometimes misrepresented wahi pana(storied places) in Waikīkī.
Wahi Pana O Waikīkī – Part 2
Returning in October 2021
More sessions exploring a variety of cultural topics are being developed. Continue to follow NaHHA for more information about these program offerings or visit the NaHHA Calendar for list of future classes. Email info@NaHHA.com for more information.
The Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority is proud to support NaHHA’s
cultural learning opportunities.
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